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Lemon Citrus Curd yellow happiness tart sweet spread

You know how people say there is power in positive thinking…? What many fail to also mention is the crippling nature of negative thinking. After researching how to make mayonnaise to death and some fantastic advice from fellow bloggers and friends…it flopped.

 

There wasn’t actually anything wrong with the recipe and research as the emulsion worked and it did look like mayo, but when I tried to adjust the seasoning so that it would taste like mayo, I went a little overboard with the lemon juice and once it split, there really was no going back. So now I just have to get back on the horse and try again.

 

But while I was gathering the courage to actually make the mayo, I decided to turn my procrastination into something productive and tackled making lemon curd for the first time. Well, I had to find something to do with those lovely fresh, free range eggs I had bought to make mayo… ;). I found this lovely recipe and it was a good way of using up the big bag of lemons my mom had passed on to me after being given some from a neighbour’s tree. For the recipe, go to http://sweetapolita.com/2012/05/sunshine-sweet-citrus-curd/ . I have also copied and pasted it down below for your convenience. I was pleasantly surprised to find how easy it was and I’m looking forward to making some passion fruit curd within the next few days.

 

Citrus Curd        

 

*loosely adapted from Williams Sonoma

 

Yield: ~ 1-3/4 cups

 

Ingredients

 

4 lemons (or 6 Meyer lemons), or 2 oranges, or 5 limes (or 8 Key Limes), preferably organic

 

2 whole eggs plus 4 egg yolks

 

1 cup sugar (200 grams) (7 ounces)

 

4 tablespoons (60 grams) (2 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature and cut into small even cubes

 

Method

 

1. Wash citrus really well (with a bristled brush under cold water) and using a Zester , remove all of the coloured portion of the peel from the fruit (not the white pith–it’s bitter!) into a bowl or onto a piece of wax paper. Rotate fruit as necessary to get as much of the zest off. Repeat until you have 2 teaspoons (30 mL) of the zest, and set aside.

 

2. Slice the citrus in half crosswise (I find room temperature citrus is best for juicing) using a sharp knife, and extract as much of the juice as you can using a citrus reamer, or I use a small Citrus Juicer . Just be sure to catch all of the juice in a bowl and to completely strain the seeds before using. Repeat the juicing until you have 2/3 cup (5 fl oz/160 mL) of the strained juice.

 

3. Get your double boiler ready by filling a saucepan with 1″ of water, then placing a metal bowl on top of the saucepan. You will need to ensure the bowl fits snugly into the top of the saucepan and that the bottom of the bowl doesn’t touch the water (important, or your eggs will cook!). You can now remove the bowl and continue with making the curd.

 

4. Whisk the juice, whole eggs, egg yolks and sugar in the bowl until smooth. Add the butter cubes to the bowl, but don’t stir.

 

5. Heat the water in the saucepan over low heat until it simmers (not boils) and place the bowl atop the rim. Stirring gently, but constantly, using heatproof spatula or wooden spoon, cook until the curd has thickened and all of the butter has melted and is incorporated, about 10 minutes (this can vary). To test if the curd is thick enough, remove the spatula or spoon from the curd and check that it’s coated.

 

6. Strain the curd over a bowl using a fine-mesh sieve and then stir in the zest. Cover with plastic wrap pressed directly against the curd (to prevent a skin from forming) and chill for at least 3 hours (I like to chill it overnight). It also thickens up a bit more while chilling.

 

Sweetapolita’s Notes:

 

You can use the chilled curd right away, keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 3 days, or freeze the curd in an airtight container with plastic wrap pressed directly onto the curd surface for up to 1 month. To use frozen curd, you can remove from freezer and use immediately–no need to thaw it as it doesn’t really freeze, per se. You can either scoop out what you need and keep the rest in the freezer or use all at once

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